Design

The "French touch" of Caroline Sarkozy

© Jean-Marc Palisse

Interview with Caroline Sarkozy, the interior designer who knows all the nuggets of French craftsmanship, puts at work the greatest, explores and pushes the limits of this world of demand and tailor-made ...

Fascinated by the handmade work, the interior designer Caroline Sarkozy carves her projects of the most noble materials, the finest techniques. An eternal Parisian chic that illustrates the claw of this tireless researcher of "extra-ordinary". As in this duplex apartment where the attention to detail touches the extreme. Concentrate of elegance made in France!

So your business is also abroad?

Caroline Sarkozy: It is especially the reflection of my story, the result of a nomadic childhood in the wake of a diplomatic father-in-law who took us to the four corners of the world according to his missions. This itinerary gave rise to many meetings, to inevitable inspirations but also to rare moments that built me. The Middle East, Asia, the United States, England, New York where I studied at the Parsons School of Design laid the foundation for a panoramic approach to influences and styles. Evidence that today sixty percent of my work is outside the borders of France. At the moment I have construction sites in Switzerland, in Colorado but also in Auvergne and Deauville!

Is your French culture in demand?

Caroline Sarkozy: I always bring an Anglo-Saxon touch that we find in the concept of comfort. The French spirit, expressed in the sense of detail, proportions, this traditional approach to a reinterpreted craft remains highly coveted. The outline, the simplification also sign the French achievements. By working remotely I realize how much our craftsmen, carpenters, painters, marble workers, are precious.

How are your projects organized?

Caroline Sarkozy: I collaborate for seven years with the architect Laurent Bourgois. A common philosophy and great complicity allow us to move forward together. Very contemporary apartment or more traditional restoration, its register of expression is very broad. The proximity of our offices, a few meters from each other, promotes constructive exchanges. Architecture and decoration must be apprehended in a common spirit. For the choice of works I trust Arabelle Reille-Mahdavi, art consultant, who chose all the rooms in this apartment.

For your interventions abroad, are the craftsmen French?

Caroline Sarkozy: I want to export their know-how as much as possible on the spot. Here, during the renovation of this London apartment many of them were part of the trip. The onyx glued on glass doors of the bathroom is the work of Techniques Transparentes, very present on all my sites. The painters in the studio of Lucien Tourtoulou, often from the Compagnons du Devoir, have fashioned the walls of fine plaster combs, stencilled drawings. All the locksmith work is the work of the Schmidt establishments, as for Reese Studio, they are at the origin of the lacquered decorative panels of the dining room.

Does this type of project correspond to the essence of your activity?

Caroline Sarkozy: I work a lot on this type of place but also on more modest adventures, like the development of a studio of thirty square meters. Small spaces pose other problems and obviously require more rational solutions. The contrast between the two is an exercise that pleases me and revives ideas.